pap-smear-promo-2016

PAP Smear
(FDA APPROVED METHOD & LATEST TECHNOLOGY)

QHC’s Medical Pap smear package includes:

1. Physical Examination
2. Blood Pressure
3. Breast Examination
4. Pelvic Scan
5. Pap Smear
6. O&G Consultation

Pap Test
What Is a Pap Test?
A Pap test is a test of a sample of cells taken from a woman’s cervix. The test is used to look for changes in the cells of the cervix that show cervical cancer or conditions that may develop into cancer.

It is the best tool to detect precancerous conditions and hidden, small tumors that may lead to cervical cancer. If detected early, cervical cancer can be cured.

Pap screen testing should begin at age 21. Routine screening is recommended every two years for women 21-29 years old. For certain women 30 years and older who have had three consecutive normal screening test results, testing can be done every three years.

DNA for HPV Virus

What is HPV?
HPV is short for human papillomavirus and is a group of more than 150 related viruses. Each HPV virus in this large group is given a number which is called its HPV type. HPV is named for the warts (papillomas) some HPV types can cause. Some other HPV types can lead to cancer, especially cervical cancer. There are more than 40 HPV types that can infect the genital areas of males and females. But there are vaccines that can prevent infection with the most common types of HPV.
How do people get HPV?
HPV is transmitted through intimate skin-to-skin contact. You can get HPV by having vaginal, anal, or oral sex with someone who has the virus. It is most commonly spread during vaginal or anal sex. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI). Anyone who is sexually active can get HPV, even if you have had sex with only one person. HPV is so common that nearly all sexually active men and women get it at some point in their lives. HPV can be passed even when an infected person has no signs or symptoms. You can develop symptoms years after you have sex with someone who is infected, making it hard to know when you first became infected.

Why get vaccinated?
HPV vaccine is an inactivated (not live) vaccine which protects against four major types of HPV. These include two types that cause about 70% of cervical cancer and two types that cause about 90% of genital warts. HPV vaccine can prevent most genital warts and most cases of cervical cancer.
Protection from HPV vaccine is expected to be long-lasting. But vaccinated women still need cervical cancer screening because the vaccine does not protect against all HPV types that cause cervical cancer.

Who should get HPV vaccine and when?
Routine Vaccination
The vaccination schedule depends on the age of the subject.HPV vaccine is routinely recommended for girls 11 and 12 years of age. Doctors may give it to girls as young as 10 years.

Age at the time of the first injection Immunization and Schedule
From 10 to 14 years Two doses each of 0.5ml at 0.6 months.
From 15 years and above Three doses each of 0.5ml at 0,1,6 months.

Colposcopy and Cervical Biopsy

Colposcopy is a way for your doctor to use a special magnifying device to look at your vulva, vagina camera.gif, and cervix camera.gif. If a problem is seen during colposcopy, a small sample of tissue (biopsy) may be taken from the cervix or from inside the opening of the cervix (endocervical canal). The sample is looked at under a microscope.

Colposcopy is usually done to look at the vagina and cervix when the result of a Pap test is abnormal. Most abnormal Pap tests are caused by viral infections, such as human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, or other types of infection, such as those caused by bacteria, fungi (yeast), or protozoa (Trichomonas). Natural cervical cell changes (atrophic vaginitis) related to menopause can also cause an abnormal Pap test. In some cases, untreated cervical cell changes that cause abnormal Pap tests may progress to precancerous or cancerous changes.

During colposcopy, your doctor uses a lighted magnifying device that looks like a pair of binoculars (colposcopy). The colposcopy allows your doctor to see problems that would be missed by the naked eye. A camera can be attached to the colposcopy to take pictures or videos of the vagina and cervix.

Orthopaedic